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13 Oct 2007
Ecological Strategies in Today's Art
Oldenburg, Germany
Ecological questions, that is to say the science that studies the relationships of living things to their environment, have lost the last remnants of naive starry-eyed idealism over the past years. Environmental catastrophes such as the tsunamis, dying forest syndrome, fish mortality, cannibalism among seals, global climate warming, water shortages, as well as air and ground pollution make it clear that natural catastrophes are not only just "natural.“ They result from highly civilized ways of life that are based on exploitation and which destroy well-attuned ecosystems. The idea of ecology as a communicative system has therefore gained in influence and importance. With Free Soil, Critical Art Ensemble, Christina Hemauer/Roman Keller, MVRDV and others

Sustainability
Top
Features
By Joni Taylor
Part 1

Apocalypse may be the new black, but the Plague, the Cold War and the Millennium Bug combined did not add ...
Joni T
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Projects  

nolvadex

For the Garage festival 09 Free Soil have conducted a site specific research project investigating the environment of the Baltic Sea.

We created an alternative archive of political and historical events that have occurred in the Baltic Sea region, especially Stralsund and linked these with the sea’s responses. The impact of Industrialisation, population growth and political changes has resulted in climatic and environmental changes recorded in the sea. Nature retaliates by creating new forms, one of the most significant being the spread and growth of toxic Blue Green Algae or “phytoplankton”

Images: wooden sewerage pipe from Stralsund. &
Portrait of William Lindley the designer of the first sewerage system in Stralsund, algae on paper.
Nis
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Link of the Week:  
Interview with Fritz Haeg by Nato Thompson

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